Assembling a Hack
CCjon
Posted 2/2/2015 12:45 AM (#82571)
Subject: Assembling a Hack



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Well, this will be a first for me, so am open and receptive to ideas and suggestions. In the past have bought ready to go hacks ( 3 Urals and a Goldwing with Champion sidecar), Now after several months searching and not finding a dual sport sidecar rig that met my needs, decided to assemble my own. Assemble is the key word here as I don't know how to weld. Can drill, cut, grind, wrench, duct tape and zip tie though.

What are the needs? I plan to return to Chile / Argentina and finish a ride that was interrupted when I flipped my GS adventure crossing Tierra de Fuego in January 2012. A dual sport bike with a cargo hack that is economical to purchase, maintain, operate, readily available parts and tires locally and something that is not foreign to a MC mechanic down there if need arises. Also do not want to invest a lot of $$$ in a fancy rig as I plan to sell it down there when the ride is over. This ride is planned for next winter, summer down there.

After talking with Jay at DMC about a rolling chassis with a 19" wheel, I looked for a 650cc dual sport locally. Found a 2006 KLR650 with less than 9000 miles. Test rode it and brought it home. Now the fun starts.

Put it up on the lift Saturday and started stripping pieces off. By Saturday night, was looking like project in motion.

Edited by CCjon 2/2/2015 12:49 AM




(KLR on lift.jpg)



(KLR stripped.jpg)



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CCjon
Posted 2/2/2015 12:55 AM (#82572 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Knowing what the objective is, what do you suggest I add or not add to make the rig more reliable and complete?
Should I get a disk brake on the sidecar? I plan on mounting a lower aluminum tool box than what Jay offers in order to reduce wind resistance. Though I don't plan on carrying a heavy load, we all know if the space is there, it will get filled.
Knowing the electrical limits of a KLR, what about lighting and electric jacket?

Will a large 10 gallon safari gas tank interfere with the sidecar mounts? Anyone tried this yet?

What about an auxiliary tank on the back and gravity feed to the carb?

What say you all?
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Claus
Posted 2/2/2015 4:54 AM (#82573 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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Due to the wall thickness of the kawasaki frame tubes ( 0.04" ) I would buy or make a subframe for the motorcycle. This should connect both sides of the frame and should be able to take the sidecar at four mounts.
I personally would not like to miss a sidecar brake. If you take a small scooter rotor and caliper you can connect it to the front brake master. Maybe the master should be one size larger. It can be a used one, of course. Take a steel braided brake line. They are now available in any length for low price.
A light sidecar together with a dualsport bike like yours can be operated w/o sidecar brake but I would not recommend that.
What I would do as well is changing the rear shock to a stronger one. You´ll need it due to the +weight, the sidecar brings.
If you change the indicator relais to a load independent one for LED indicators you can mount LED indicators. The taillights and the sidecar´s marker light I would take LEDs as well. Equipped like that there will be no problems with the electric charging, because you need less charging than on the original bike w/o sidecar.

If you´re not satisfied how the rig pulls after converting you could change the rear sprocket for one with two or three teeth more. Instead of fitting a 10 gallon tank I would carry a jerrycan in the sidecar.

Edited by Claus 2/2/2015 5:00 AM
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Peter Pan
Posted 2/2/2015 10:15 AM (#82576 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Jan, I enjoyed your last summer's trip Cost to coast, So when you pass by here and later take the ferry from Colon to Cartagena,
I'd love to invite you for a rest stop and accompany you on the Goody roads, from border to border. Don't travel on the boaring straightees!

I bought my Kawa for to mount a sidecar on it, when after 2000km the tail came loose I did not continue with the plan. For a trip like you plan it is perfect, but not for this mule, writing these sentences, riding in our mountain range on a daily base.
I second the idea of a STRONG subframe, as I see the engine as pretty good choice,(24.000miles now and no issue at all) but the frame needs to be beefed up a lot!
Open the rear suspension and pack it with marine grease!!!! From factory it comes practically dry!!!
I'd suggest to use a KLR back or front wheel for the sidecar. (taking it from a scrap bike, the other wheel could work as reserve and the sidecar could be made for to accept front or back wheel. just a thought)

Take spokes with you as reserve.
Get yourself a good assembly paste, I use Chesterton 785 and 710, Excellent results for 17 years now.
Wish You good luck.
Sven
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jaydmc
Posted 2/2/2015 10:55 AM (#82578 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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As many people read these posts for many years to come, I will comment. Yes to the brake, there is limited traction on the front tire on the KLR with a loaded sidecar going down steep loose terrain I have had to chose to either use the traction that the front tire has for steering or for braking but not both. Not a choice I ever want to make again. The brake we offer uses a small brake rotor we make our selves out of cast iron and runs a Brembo caliper. It can either be worked off of the stock rear master or we do offer a separate pedal for the bike that sits next to the bikes brake pedal such that you can work one or both brakes. I also recommend a stiffer spring for the rear of the bike. We offer a spring, as it requires a special spring compressor most people ship us their shock, we install the spring (no charge to install the spring) and ship it back the same day. With our sub frame you loose any skid pans you may have. We offer an optional skid pan that works with our mounts. When ever you add a sidecar you end up with heavy steering. Most people with KLR's learn to live with the heavy steering. We do offer a leading link front end for the KLR. The mounts are not year specific, they work on all years of KLR's however the leading link is year specific, post and pre 2008.
Jay G
DMC sidecars
www.dmcsidecars.com
866-638-1793
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SwampFox
Posted 2/2/2015 9:17 PM (#82587 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Good advice above Jon. The 1st complaint I generally hear re: KLR rigs is the stock suspension is not up to the task and result in sloppy handling/steering (we've had two Texas fellows assemble KLR rigs in the past couple of years, but quickly disassemble 'em as they weren't dedicated to finishig the project). So I agree, subframe and beefy spring(s). Also, with a 6 gallon stock tank, I too suggest jerry can(s) for extra fuel rather than oversize tank - should result in better weight balance.
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CCjon
Posted 2/3/2015 8:53 PM (#82600 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Lee,thanks for that heads up. What kind of front springs have worked for other KLR hacks? Anybody know?? Only see one option on the KLR650.com site. A Studebaker brand. They have a Progressive but it is for the KLR650-B.

Today we placed our order with Jay at DMC for a rolling chassis with fender and a 19" wheel. Basically their cargo hack less the box. Will come with a DMC subframe make for the KLR and all their fittings. Wait time is 4 - 6 weeks when ordered now. Added the sidecar brake at the suggestion of many. Looked at the separate brake pedal, but since I am lowering the foot pegs, the DMC pedal won't fit, so we are going with tying into the rear master cylinder.

Also ordered the subframe reinforcement kit from Eagle Mike with several others pieces and an order with KLR650.com.

Anyone know, is there an easy way to determine if the doohickey has been upgraded? The previous owner only had the bike for a year and know little of its history.

Will be on the look out for an aftermarket seat, a taller windshield, ATV handlebars and ROX risers.

Spotted this switch above the speedo, ask the seller what it was. He said to turn off the headlight if you wanted to run without it. Well, right now that switch does nothing. Might use it to trigger some LED driving lights. When I pull the headlight cover we'll trace the wiring down.







(Mystery Switch.jpg)



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Claus
Posted 2/4/2015 9:29 AM (#82608 - in reply to #82600)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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Will come with a DMC subframe make for the KLR and all their fittings.


That was a good idea.


Looked at the separate brake pedal, but since I am lowering the foot pegs, the DMC pedal won't fit, so we are going with tying into the rear master cylinder.


If the rear master ist too small for it, take the next larger diameter . You´ll see if it ´s necessary when the pedal is real soft after bleeding and it acts as if it´can´t be bleeded properly.
With a small brembo caliper I would go from for example 12mm to 14mm (9/16") if available.


Spotted this switch above the speedo, ask the seller what it was. He said to turn off the headlight if you wanted to run without it. Well, right now that switch does nothing. Might use it to trigger some LED driving lights.



It´s perfect for LED driving lights. On my own bike I would like to have a switch to turn off headlight while starting the bike, if it´s not automatically switching off itself. That sometimes makes the difference between starting the bike under bad conditions or calling for assistance...
Put a 30A relais between switch and light, so the light gets currency directly from the battery and use the switch to cut the relay´s negative ground. You´ll find out that your headlight is +30% and the switch has only to work with milli amperes.
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jaydmc
Posted 2/4/2015 10:40 AM (#82614 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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As to suspension, talk with Kelly at Studebaker, he is a sidecarist and has ran two of our Enduro sidecars to the Artic ocean on KLR's He knows KLR better then I do when it comes to suspension.
Jay G
DMC sidecars
www.dmcsidecars.com
866-638-1793
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CCjon
Posted 2/4/2015 8:08 PM (#82623 - in reply to #82608)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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It´s perfect for LED driving lights. On my own bike I would like to have a switch to turn off headlight while starting the bike, if it´s not automatically switching off itself. That sometimes makes the difference between starting the bike under bad conditions or calling for assistance...
Put a 30A relais between switch and light, so the light gets currency directly from the battery and use the switch to cut the relay´s negative ground. You´ll find out that your headlight is +30% and the switch has only to work with milli amperes.


Thanks Claus, will install the 30A relay for the driving lights.
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CCjon
Posted 2/4/2015 8:19 PM (#82624 - in reply to #82614)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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jaydmc - 2/4/2015 9:40 AM

As to suspension, talk with Kelly at Studebaker,


Thanks Jay. Did a google search but only came up with the former auto company. Can you PM me the contact email or phone #?


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Claus
Posted 2/5/2015 5:33 AM (#82631 - in reply to #82623)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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CCjon - 2/5/2015 2:08 AM



It´s perfect for LED driving lights. On my own bike I would like to have a switch to turn off headlight while starting the bike, if it´s not automatically switching off itself. That sometimes makes the difference between starting the bike under bad conditions or calling for assistance...
Put a 30A relais between switch and light, so the light gets currency directly from the battery and use the switch to cut the relay´s negative ground. You´ll find out that your headlight is +30% and the switch has only to work with milli amperes.


Thanks Claus, will install the 30A relay for the driving lights.


My post was mentioned to the normal headlight, not for the LED driving light. They can be connected w/o a relais. (in case I understood something wrong due to normally speaking German)
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jaydmc
Posted 2/5/2015 10:49 AM (#82637 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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Studebaker manufacturing is also I believe KLR.com Here is a link to their contact information. http://start.cortera.com/company/research/k2l0sur1r/studebaker-manu... For what it is worth, they also for a while were brought the Vetter Terraplane back into production.
Jay G
DMC sidecars
www.dmcsidecars.com
866-638-1793
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CCjon
Posted 2/8/2015 10:52 PM (#82674 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Continue stripping parts off the bike. Found many to be rusted so bad they are snapping off. Have relied on a B"LASTER PB a penetrating catalyst to loose nuts and bolts. A steading treatment of spray, waits, wrench, spray again, wait, try again and again. Finally getting the bolt off.

Ordered a subframe reinforcing kit which requires drilling through a solid steel backbone of the KLR.


Edited by CCjon 2/9/2015 11:24 AM




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CCjon
Posted 2/8/2015 11:01 PM (#82675 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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KLR's have a well known achilles heel - commonly referred to as the "doohickey". The Doo is a spring actuated cam chain tensioner. The spring and Doo have been known to break, allowing small steel parts to wander around causing havoc with the engine.

Spotted a posting about how to check if your Doo is okay or not. Requires removing the left side engine cover.

Then look to the left and behind the stub where the Doo pivots. You should see part of the spring. Opened the case but could not see the spring.

Edited by CCjon 2/9/2015 11:27 AM




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CCjon
Posted 2/8/2015 11:07 PM (#82676 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Took it step further and removed the next case and flywheel. This is what I found.


Luckily both pieces were still attached and not wandering around loose. Installed an upgrade, an Eagle Mike cam chain tensioner with torsion spring.


Edited by CCjon 2/8/2015 11:12 PM




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SwampFox
Posted 2/9/2015 8:10 AM (#82687 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Look at that broken spring - sure glad you took the time to inspect before the journey. Looks like you're making good progress.

By the way, I've "heard" that a smaller front wheel, say 18", will reduce trail on a KLR with favorable results.
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Peter Pan
Posted 2/9/2015 8:44 AM (#82690 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Uhhh, that was close. Thank you for reminding me.
So in the future each time I take that slack out, I will have to recheck if it does it in deed!
In fact twice I have heard a small movement...tick.
Continue well in your preparations.

Sven
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CCjon
Posted 2/9/2015 10:39 PM (#82720 - in reply to #82690)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Peter Pan - 2/9/2015 7:44 AM

So in the future each time I take that slack out, I will have to recheck if it does it in deed!
In fact twice I have heard a small movement...tick.
Sven


Sven if you remove the left side case cover, you should be able to see the spring behind the doohickey. To test if the spring is working, loosed the bolt holding the cam chain tensioner one half turn. With a long screwdriver, push the Doo to the right, then release. If working properly, it will return to center on its own. If not, then something is wrong and you will have to remove the second case and flywheel to see why the Doo doesn't return to center.

Ride safe
Jan
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CCjon
Posted 3/5/2015 10:28 AM (#83222 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Sorry for the delay in build progress. Life keeps interrupting.

Every morning I kept finding a small dribble of oil on the lift. Discovered the rear shock is shot, leaking oil. Looked into rebuilding the OEM shock, was told is not feasible, and if feasible, not cost effective. Then looked at the cost of an aftermarket shock.... WOW! Since DMC is going to install a stronger spring on the rear shock as part of the package purchase, opted for buying another OEM shock off eBay.

The KLR has been recolored and slowly coming back together.

As boxes of bits and pieces arrive, they are added on.

As she stands now, the bike is ready to ride. But, Sorry Charlie, she will NOT be getting fitted with a sidecar....!



Edited by CCjon 3/5/2015 10:35 AM




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CCjon
Posted 3/5/2015 10:32 AM (#83223 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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A big eyed beauty has entered the picture and will be the new tug of choice.



(P3025084.jpg)



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Peter Pan
Posted 3/5/2015 2:37 PM (#83226 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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nice colours nice eyes. I have seen that face somewhen in a film. ( together with Gregory Peck?)
The brown one is service friendly...what fore to wash?
Thank You for the tip and explanation.
Sven
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CCjon
Posted 4/1/2015 9:44 PM (#83709 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Finished up the Gen 1 KLR, thought it was sold, but still have it. Is getting crowded in the garage with three bikes here. Need to make room for the crate coming from DMC.

Have been working on the Gen 2 KLR, while we wait for the sidecar chassis to arrive. Added handlebar risers, USB port on the front, LED headlight bulbs, fork brace, installed the upgraded Doohickey, the saddlebag rack and topbox plate.

The bike's wiring was studied and changed around. Getting under the seat to check a fuse takes too long when on the side of the road. So the main fuses were relocated to under the left side panel. Since I'll be wiring in additional outlets, looked and looked for a fuse block that would fit the KLR, finally found a long narrow one for six fused circuits. Again mounted it on the left side so I can check and change any fuse without having to remove multiple nuts and bolts.

Decided to upgrade the drive chain and sprockets for pulling a sidecar. Installed a heavy duty 525 o-ring chain, a 15 tooth 525 counter sprocket and and a 49 tooth rear sprocket.

Little by little the big eyed beauty is getting ready for a rolling chassis. DMC Sidecar advised me to be on the look out a a large wooden crate arriving soon. Christmas in April, I love it.

Edited by CCjon 4/1/2015 9:53 PM




(06 KLR done.jpg)



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CCjon
Posted 4/1/2015 9:59 PM (#83710 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Other work done was to upgrade the rear subframe with the Eagle Mike kit by drilling through the main frame backbone. Installed a simple non-vacuum petcock on the gas tank, then rejected the carb. Not sure if will change the exhaust or not. The DG is too loud, but would like a more open flow, without spending a lot.

Edited by CCjon 4/1/2015 11:31 PM
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SwampFox
Posted 4/2/2015 8:44 AM (#83720 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Hey, that's a good idea moving the fuse block for easy access.
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CCjon
Posted 4/3/2015 9:57 AM (#83741 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Yesterday was a good day. Was able to complete several items that were waiting for parts to arrive.

Removed the front wheel, dropped the forks in order to reposition the handlebar cables from in front to behind the triple tree. With the handlebar riser they were tight and binding in front.

With the front wheel off, replaced the stock brake rotor with a larger 320mm rotor for better stopping ability. While on the front, replaced the stock rubber brake line with a Galfer steel braided line, then proceeded to replace the brake fluid and bleed the air out. Installed the spacer from Eagle Mike to relocate the brake pistons to accommodate the larger rotor. With the front end reassembled, turned to the rear brakes

Left the rear stock rotor as is, but upgraded to a Galfer steel braided line. More important, added a double banjo bolt and the brake line for the sidecar. The sidecar brake line has a quick disconnect coupling for when you need to disconnect the sidecar from the bike for any reason. The electrical connections will also have an in-line plug for uncoupling. Don't plan on riding this bike without the sidecar, but if the bike later needs to go up on a lift for service, is best if the sidecar can be easily uncoupled.

Final task on the rear brakes was to replaced the brake fluid and bleed the air out. Of all the wrenching tasks on a bike, to me, working on brakes and bleeding them is the least desirable chore of all. But is now done and can focus on more enjoyable wrenching.

Trucking company called, they have a crate for me. Oh boy, Santa's coming.




(Cable relocation.jpg)



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Peter Pan
Posted 4/4/2015 12:00 PM (#83752 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Now it looks as if things become more interesting
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CCjon
Posted 4/5/2015 12:53 AM (#83771 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Santa arrived.... the crate was delivered. Popped off the end panel to reveal the DMC 19" wheel. Quickly the top and siders were removed. There she was, the DMC rolling chassis ordered back in early February. Quickly parts were unwrapped and organized for installation.

First there undercarriage, that went pretty smooth. Then the upper two brackets. Wasn't sure if the engine bracket would fit, seeing as how you have to thread it in and around the various parts but everything came together and was tightened.







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CCjon
Posted 4/5/2015 1:07 AM (#83772 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Progress was made installing then undercarriage and both upper mounts. The undercarriage, that went pretty smooth. a little friendly persuasion at times, but smooth. The upper two brackets took some study and thought. Wasn't sure if the upper front bracket would fit, seeing as how you have to thread the pieces in and around in order to bolt together using six bolts. Once installed it is very secure, rock solid. With everything in place, all bolts were tightened.

Wiring for the sidecar and driving lights were completed and ready to go. Finally body panels were reinstalled.

Would love to get the bike off the lift and attach the sidecar next week, but tax return preparation time is now!

Edited by CCjon 4/5/2015 1:14 AM




(Undercarriage rear.jpg)



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Hack'n
Posted 4/5/2015 2:19 PM (#83776 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Those Harbor Freight lifts are somewhat spooky. I replaced my neighbor's safety stop (conduit) tube with a 3/4" solid cold rolled steel bar. It bent easily with a middleweight bike on the hoist.
That take out piece under the rear tire is also easily displaced.

Be careful with it!

Lonnie
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CCjon
Posted 4/5/2015 5:48 PM (#83780 - in reply to #83776)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Hack'n - 4/5/2015 1:19 PM
I replaced my neighbor's safety stop (conduit) tube with a 3/4" solid cold rolled steel bar.

Lonnie


Must have been a newer model, mine is ten years old, came with a solid steel safety bar. The hydraulic pump needs an oil top off every couple of years though.

A lift is one of the best tools one can buy when working on used bikes. That and a metric tap-n-die set.
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IndSlim
Posted 4/6/2015 1:03 PM (#83796 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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Is that the quick disconnect sold on ebay?
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CCjon
Posted 4/6/2015 5:49 PM (#83798 - in reply to #83796)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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IndSlim - 4/6/2015 12:03 PM

Is that the quick disconnect sold on ebay?


The brake line coupler was supplied by DMC as part of the rig set up. Not sure if they sell those online or not, but am sure DMC can sell you one.

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Peter Pan
Posted 4/6/2015 7:49 PM (#83800 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Congratulations Jan,
and thank you very much for the detailed insight you permit us.
Tell me please, how stiff do you see the whole set up and subframe?
You know Centralamerican roads are TOUGH and mountain range even much worse.
Do You think that your KLR-rig will become maniac-prove?
When I had after only 2000 something km my tail lifting 6" I got so big doubts about the solidness of the KLR that I now have the KLR as dedicated solo and got me a Ural as replacement for the Jawa.
(I still see the Street Jawa (with another replacement motor) as better mountain goat then the Ural)
Best regards and good luck.
Sven
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CCjon
Posted 4/7/2015 1:12 AM (#83802 - in reply to #83800)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Peter Pan - 4/6/2015 6:49 PM
Tell me please, how stiff do you see the whole set up and subframe?
You know Centralamerican roads are TOUGH and mountain range even much worse.
Do You think that your KLR-rig will become maniac-prove?
Sven


Sven, thanks for the questions.
My initial impression is that it is very well designed and built. Particularly the front upper strut. That strut is anchored in three separate locations, giving it structural rigidity. My impression is that the front upper strut and the two lower mounts take the majority of the sidecar related stresses, so those should be the strongest links.

The undercarriage comes as two halves, a left and a right. It is mounted to the bike with six bolts, plus four more that bolt the two sides together. The skid plate also links the two halves but doubt it adds much rigidity. The rear upper mount clamps to the rear subframe, which has been reinforced with an Eagle Mike subframe kit.

This is not a Dakar race rig, but see no reason why you couldn't go around the world with it.

Since I don't carry a passenger, the sidecar load will consist of spare fuel, water, camping gear, tools, parts, and personal gear. Less weight than if I had a passenger.

Once it is assembled and test ridden, am sure there will be some adjustments.

Questions about why something was done a particular way are welcome. If you think of a better way to do something or spot a potential flaw, please post up.

Thanks
CCjon


Edited by CCjon 4/7/2015 1:13 AM
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Peter Pan
Posted 4/7/2015 9:02 AM (#83808 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Thank you very much Jan...I am looking forward to meet you on the road soon. and continue lurking with a lot of interest.
Sven
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CCjon
Posted 4/16/2015 7:23 AM (#83936 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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The time has come for the KLR and the sidecar chassis to be joined for evermore. The last few items needed have arrived, so a quick call to my friend/neighbor Gary was in order. Since this was the first time for either of us to install a sidecar, we read the instructions, reread them then watched a youtube video on how to do it.

Of course it helps to have a big hammer on hand. If that doesn't work, the Russians say you need a bigger hammer.

It is critical that the sidecar be level, so we did our best to accomplish that. Two other critical factors are of course Lean-out and Toe-in.

Three hours later, we finally had it attached and level. Bolts are tight, but not wrenched!!! for now.

Of course what do you do with a new toy???? Well.................. ride it.

You experienced sidecarist will cringe at this photo. That empty, light frame will "FLY' with the slightest input..... and it did. This was a quick ride down the street and back to see if the settings were close or needed more adjustment. Everything was GOOD! No further adjustments for now. Wow, first timers, first time and we are very close to a final set-up. The temporary blue tape is holding wires, etc out of the way while we were assembling the parts.

Edited by CCjon 4/16/2015 2:55 PM




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CCjon
Posted 4/16/2015 7:28 AM (#83937 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Now to add some weight to the sidecar. The used truck tool box I picked up is a double lid, aluminum box that we then modified by adding rubber latches to make sure the wind did not catch a lid and flip it up. Second we added hasps for locking and securing the lids after we removed the factory latches. This will keep my camping and personal gear safe and dry.

Because the bottom of the aluminum box is not very rigid and not wide enough to cover all of the sidecar frame, decided to cut out a 3/4" plywood base for the sidecar then mount the box and auxiliary gas cans on top of that. With the plywood down, we then positioned the box and base fore and aft. Did not want the box to be further back than our rear taillight. The front edge of the box is in line with the front axle.

Lined up the rear fender with the tool box... The front edge of the box lines up with the front axle on the KLR.

Next was to cut the plywood, trim it, stain it and attach everything. Added metal edging to the front and rear edges of the plywood for weather protection. The box and base were then bolted to the chassis.

Between the bottom of the plywood and the ground is 12 inches. That is the ground clearance I was looking for and could not find on any already set-up adventure sidecar rig. The ground clearance under the KLR is 7 1/2 inches. Am pleased with the high ground clearance and a low profile front of the sidecar. Will offer less wind resistance. It rolls very easy. Much easier than the Ural did.

Made a box frame to hold in the two NATO gas cans, 2.5 gallons each. That will give me a total of 11-12+ gallons of gas. Will add a bicycle cable lock besides the bungee cord to keep the two gas cans. safely on board. There are several nooks and crannies where more things can be mounted to the sidecar floor. Any suggestions?

Like most complicated projects, some unforeseen developments arise. For one, the used Pelican panniers that I bought from another KLR rider fit on perfectly. The right pannier can be mounted and removed easily. However with the sidecar cargo box in place, the right pannier cannot open. If it were a top opening box, would be okay, but a side opening box is not going to work. The tool box opens fine, but the pannier cannot fully open.

Now the decision is, do I ride with just the left pannier, use the right pannier knowing I can only access the contents if I remove it from the bike everytime or sell this set up and find a complete pannier set up of top load boxes? Do I even need panniers with the big tool box?

Of course there are more, MANY more things yet to be done before this rig is ready for long distance travel. Today was a major step in moving this project forward.


Thanks for following along with this build.

CCjon


Edited by CCjon 4/16/2015 2:58 PM




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SwampFox
Posted 4/16/2015 8:09 AM (#83938 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Sure looking fwd to seeing this rig in action at the Muster. As for the right side Pelican case, maybe use it for spare tubes/parts and such that you might only need to access a couple times --or less-- on the journey?
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Peter Pan
Posted 4/16/2015 9:01 AM (#83940 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Hello Jan,
Is the box already in a fix position? How about to move it outwards closer to the fender?

My proposal is to change the position of the gasoline tanks and the right luggage box = swap them.
Several close calls I had were about to hit right where you have now the gas cans...and you want as little weight as possible in the nose...remember the left turns are more dangerous then the right turns.
Plus you can use the luggage box for clothes as easy take off/on option. A key and done, ready for a shower in the evening or the road in the morning.

For my last few set ups I did measure the bike's shock length under load and then tied it for the set up with a ratchet type cloth belt lugguage spanner to the loaded length I nailed/wrote down in the maintenance log book.(some future help including for to check shocks.
Specially this method was helpfull for the set up when I changed the engine in the Jawa against a Husquarna...I had reliable measurements as reference for to locate the engine in such way, the back sprocket swing pivot and front sprocket line up in one straight line under typical load...
(side note: last week I saw an ugly engine change that broke off the back sprocket base plate out off the wheel base due to the tension hits___in 6 month)

I see the KLR with a very soft suspension. out of my MZ and Jawa comparing experience I do suggest you for the KLR a sway bar tensioner... The MZ with its "Superelastic" sidecar became unrideable in the occasion I disconnected its tension bars swing couplings... That aspect might have been taken care of by the strong center shock you installed.


Best luck
Sven


Edited by Peter Pan 4/16/2015 9:08 AM
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CCjon
Posted 4/16/2015 3:01 PM (#83947 - in reply to #83938)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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SwampFox - 4/16/2015 7:09 AM

Sure looking fwd to seeing this rig in action at the Muster. As for the right side Pelican case, maybe use it for spare tubes/parts and such that you might only need to access a couple times --or less-- on the journey?


Thank you Lee.

Not sure I'll make the muster now. The powers that be informed me a grandson's birthday party is the 2nd and grandpa is expected to be there....smiling.
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CCjon
Posted 4/16/2015 3:21 PM (#83948 - in reply to #83940)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Peter Pan - 4/16/2015 8:01 AM 
Is the box already in a fix position? How about to move it outwards closer to the fender? My proposal is to change the position of the gasoline tanks and the right luggage box = swap them.


I see the KLR with a very soft suspension. out of my MZ and Jawa comparing experience I do suggest you for the KLR a sway bar tensioner... The MZ with its "Superelastic" sidecar became unrideable in the occasion I disconnected its tension bars swing couplings... That aspect might have been taken care of by the strong center shock you installed 

Sven,

The box is in a fixed position now. Thought about moving it outward, but then the gas cans would be crowding my foot and leg. Rode several thousand KMs on the Ural with two gas cans in the same position, no problems. If there is a problem, I want those cans far away from me. 

 You are right, a stronger rear spring was added to the shock. I also installed raising links  (longer dog bones to lift the rear end) in order to accomplish two things: one, it stiffens the rear shock even more, plus it reduces steering effort by changing the rake on the front. Accomplishes the same as going with a smaller diameter front wheel.  With my 250 lbs on the bike, the rear shock barely moves. It is stiff. 

 

 

 



Edited by CCjon 4/16/2015 3:24 PM
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SwampFox
Posted 4/20/2015 8:02 AM (#83998 - in reply to #83947)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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CCjon - 4/16/2015 3:01 PM
... grandson's birthday party is the 2nd and grandpa is expected to be there....smiling.


We understand such things ... but prefer the concept of camping with grandpa like a couple of years ago.

Please try to come join us for lunch 11am Friday May 1st at the Trails End Diner in Huxley - might be a little long for a 1-day round trip on the new KLR outfit, but it's just a stretch of the legs for Da'mu.
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Peter Pan
Posted 4/20/2015 9:45 AM (#84000 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Hello Jan,
you killed 2 flies with one strike... decent shock and less trail...well done.
With the gas can it is up to everybody himself, I see it in mine that the 10liter 2 1/2 gal fit, but 20l-5 gal or 2 of the small ones would become very tight.
And now: "How do you recognize a happy biker?"
-
"When the flies in between the teeth are smiling!"

Get out of the workshop . Its time to check if everything you passed from the brain to reality, if it really does fulfil what you expected.
Enjoy the ride with the little one
Grinn,,,bssssttt
Sven
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CCjon
Posted 4/26/2015 11:22 PM (#84106 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Meet Damit 2.0, the new adventure rig. Finally got out of the garage and put a little grass between her toes.
The rig is ready to ride but not quite ready for serious adventure. Still have a few farkles to decide on and install.

Thanks for following along with this "Lets put a rig together" thread.



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jaydmc
Posted 4/27/2015 10:33 AM (#84120 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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You really need to move the jerry cans, The weight is in the wrong location, you will not be happy with how it rides with these full.
Jay G
DMC sidecars
www.dmcsidecars.com
866-638-1793
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CCjon
Posted 4/27/2015 5:36 PM (#84136 - in reply to #84120)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Thank you Jay. Am very pleased with the chassis and KLR subframe you built for Damit.

Over the last two years and 40,000 kms I carried five gallons of gas in that same location on a URAL with no issues. Is it because the KLR is so much lighter than the URAL?

Copying the URAL layout, will soon be mounting a spare rear wheel/tire thus adding more weight to the rear section of the SC. Once that is complete, will re-evaluate the location of the two jerry cans and how their weight affects handling.

I added a baffle wall inside the toolbox so heavy items cannot slide forward in a panic stop.The front of the tool box is for light gear, sleeping bag, rain gear, gloves, etc. The rear section is for tools, parts, oil, water, boots, etc.



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CCjon
Posted 8/3/2015 11:05 AM (#85642 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Tested the weight distribution on the sidecar and Jay is right, too much weight too far forward.
So rebuilt the SC platform with one gas can in front of and one behind the sidecar wheel. While cutting the new base, decided to relocate the battery from the bike to the SC and up size it.
So with those changes plus mounting the spare tire and new LED aux lights, here is what Da'mit 2.2 looks like now.



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