Titling a DNEPR Mt-16
caffel
Posted 7/5/2010 5:48 PM (#52291)
Subject: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16


Posts: 5
Apparently imported as parts w a sidecar in 2005.
What process to get a title.
I am in Penna.

Charlie
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Hack'n
Posted 7/5/2010 11:44 PM (#52306 - in reply to #52291)
Subject: Re: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16



Posts: 4833
Location: Boise, Idaho
Gray market rigs are tough to title and impossible to pass inspection in some states. Many are relegated to off road duty and trailered on the road. Some end up being parted out and the sidecar mounted to a DOT bike.
No problems with the sidecar since it's not a motor vehicle.

Lonnie
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caffel
Posted 7/6/2010 3:17 PM (#52320 - in reply to #52291)
Subject: Re: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16


Posts: 5
having said that, If you think of this as a WW II machine. Do we have some justification for calling it 1940 model ?
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Hack'n
Posted 7/6/2010 3:54 PM (#52321 - in reply to #52320)
Subject: Re: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16



Posts: 4833
Location: Boise, Idaho
It's most likely a WWII clone. The Ukrainians are still making them with the old patterns.

Lonnie
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VLAD
Posted 7/7/2010 1:53 PM (#52358 - in reply to #52320)
Subject: Re: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16



Posts: 411
Location: DENVER, COLORADO
MT-16 is latest (i think) model of Dnepr motorcycle. Nobody made Dnepr & Urals in 1940s. They start make them after WW II. Dnepr start from K-750; K-650: MT-9; MT-10; MT-10-36; MT-11..... About Title call your local (state) DOT.
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caffel
Posted 7/7/2010 4:59 PM (#52360 - in reply to #52291)
Subject: Re: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16


Posts: 5
Thanks. So what was the first year of the MT-10-36 (subsequently called MT-16)?
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Phelonius
Posted 2/10/2011 8:52 AM (#56115 - in reply to #52358)
Subject: Re: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16



Posts: 725
Location: N.lat 20- 13' -58" W.lon 155 - 48' - 31"
VLAD - 7/7/2010 10:53 AM

MT-16 is latest (i think) model of Dnepr motorcycle. Nobody made Dnepr & Urals in 1940s. They start make them after WW II. Dnepr start from K-750; K-650: MT-9; MT-10; MT-10-36; MT-11..... About Title call your local (state) DOT.


They were made during the war years. The Russians purchased 5 BMW rigs just before the war and reverse engineered a factory that produced them for the army. They were Flathead 750cc models somewhat like the BMW R12.
After the war they procured tooling from BMW to produce rigs.

Phelonius

Edited by Phelonius 2/10/2011 3:14 PM
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VLAD
Posted 4/29/2011 2:26 PM (#57554 - in reply to #56115)
Subject: Re: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16



Posts: 411
Location: DENVER, COLORADO
Phelonius - 2/10/2011 8:52 AM

VLAD - 7/7/2010 10:53 AM

MT-16 is latest (i think) model of Dnepr motorcycle. Nobody made Dnepr & Urals in 1940s. They start make them after WW II. Dnepr start from K-750; K-650: MT-9; MT-10; MT-10-36; MT-11..... About Title call your local (state) DOT.


They were made during the war years. The Russians purchased 5 BMW rigs just before the war and reverse engineered a factory that produced them for the army. They were Flathead 750cc models somewhat like the BMW R12.
After the war they procured tooling from BMW to produce rigs.

Phelonius

Dnepr made in capital of Ukraine Kiev wich been ocupied by germans till 1944...
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VLAD
Posted 4/29/2011 2:42 PM (#57555 - in reply to #56115)
Subject: Re: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16



Posts: 411
Location: DENVER, COLORADO
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search

Dnepr motorcycle
Dnepr motorcycle is the brand name of heavy motorcycles produced in Kiev, Ukraine. It has been in use since 1967.

Motorcycles have been produced in Kiev since 1946 at the Kiev Motorcycle Plant (Kievski Mototsikletnyi Zavod (KMZ). Initial production was of a 98 cc two-stroke model that was confiscated from the German firm Wanderer as reparations. The original design for KMZ heavy motorcycles, and their cousin the IMZ, is taken from the pre-World War II German BMW motorcycle R71, which the Soviet Union licensed in 1940. The plant and equipment needed to make the M-72 (the Soviet derivative of the BMW R71) was transferred from the Gorkiy Motorcycle Plant (Gorkovkiy Mototsikletnyi Zavod, GMZ located in the city of Gorkiy (Nizhny Novgorod) in 1949. The first batch of M-72 motorcycles was produced in 1952 with the supply of 500 engines from IMZ. In 1958 KMZ replaced the plunger framed M72-N with the swingarm framed K-750. In 1964, KMZ introduced a military model, the MV-750 with a differential two-wheel drive to the sidecar wheel. In 1967, to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Great October Socialist Revolution, KMZ released their first OHV engine in the "Dnepr" K-650. Unlike the earlier sidevalve engines with their roller bearing crankshafts, this engine featured a sleeve bearing crankshaft as found in the World War II Z├╝ndapp KS750. The K-650 was superseded by model MT-9 650 cc, which was available in both solo and sidecar models (often referred to as the best "Cossack") (NOBODY COLED IT LIKE THAT IN FORMAL USSR- VLAD) as it was reliable and featured a new transmission with reverse gear and an automatic declutching mechanism incorporated into the riders foot pedal. The MT-10 was the first Soviet motorcycle to feature 12 volt electrics.

The Dnepr is famous for its off-road capability. Armed services models equipped with sidecars had two-wheel drive and as much as 15 cm (5.9 in) of ground clearance. The present engine is a 650 cc OHV boxer twin. Modern models are sold with engines ranging from the factory standard 650 to 750 and 1,000 cc.

These motorcycles have featured in many films like Indiana Jones and used prominently in the movie Garden State, with Zach Braff.

Between 1973 and 1979 Dnepr was one of the makes marketed by Satra in the United Kingdom as Cossack motorcycles. [1]

Since demise of U.S.S.R. the factory had fallen on very hard times. Production decreased to only remnants of former glory. All shops were closed, and machine tools were taken out of the city limits.


Edited by VLAD 4/29/2011 10:33 PM
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SidecarMike
Posted 4/29/2011 3:57 PM (#57556 - in reply to #52306)
Subject: Re: Titling a DNEPR Mt-16



Posts: 1710
Location: Menomonie, Wisconsin USA

Hack'n - 7/5/2010 10:44 PM Gray market rigs are tough to title and impossible to pass inspection in some states. Many are relegated to off road duty and trailered on the road. Some end up being parted out and the sidecar mounted to a DOT bike. No problems with the sidecar since it's not a motor vehicle. Lonnie

 State inspectors are educating themselves on this topic.  About a year ago a friend was having a reconstructed Pugeot deisel inspected.  I was with him and wearing a Ural T shirt.  The inspector was telling us about having just inspected a grey market Ural claiming it was a 1960's vintage.  The cop rattled off a dozen ways to tell it's true age.  Not having a Ural, I didn't take notes, but I remember one of them was that the square tail light and marker lights didn't come about until the 1990's.  He talked about the location of welds on the frames, differences in the lettering on gauges, and even differences in the diameter of the spokes and the way the sidecar fender lip is rolled.  I was impressed.

He said it's not unusual to have a newer vehicle with left over old parts, but you seldom see an old one with parts that are significantly newer.

As a hint to any Sneaky Petes out there.  He said he would specifically ask questions like, "Is this the original frame"?  If you fess up to having replaced it, he would go on to something else.  He said most dummies will insist that it is the original, at which time he starts picking it apart.

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