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Assembling a Hack
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CCjon
Posted 2/2/2015 12:45 AM (#82571)
Subject: Assembling a Hack



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Location: NWHouston
Well, this will be a first for me, so am open and receptive to ideas and suggestions. In the past have bought ready to go hacks ( 3 Urals and a Goldwing with Champion sidecar), Now after several months searching and not finding a dual sport sidecar rig that met my needs, decided to assemble my own. Assemble is the key word here as I don't know how to weld. Can drill, cut, grind, wrench, duct tape and zip tie though.

What are the needs? I plan to return to Chile / Argentina and finish a ride that was interrupted when I flipped my GS adventure crossing Tierra de Fuego in January 2012. A dual sport bike with a cargo hack that is economical to purchase, maintain, operate, readily available parts and tires locally and something that is not foreign to a MC mechanic down there if need arises. Also do not want to invest a lot of $$$ in a fancy rig as I plan to sell it down there when the ride is over. This ride is planned for next winter, summer down there.

After talking with Jay at DMC about a rolling chassis with a 19" wheel, I looked for a 650cc dual sport locally. Found a 2006 KLR650 with less than 9000 miles. Test rode it and brought it home. Now the fun starts.

Put it up on the lift Saturday and started stripping pieces off. By Saturday night, was looking like project in motion.

Edited by CCjon 2/2/2015 12:49 AM




(KLR on lift.jpg)



(KLR stripped.jpg)



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CCjon
Posted 2/2/2015 12:55 AM (#82572 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Knowing what the objective is, what do you suggest I add or not add to make the rig more reliable and complete?
Should I get a disk brake on the sidecar? I plan on mounting a lower aluminum tool box than what Jay offers in order to reduce wind resistance. Though I don't plan on carrying a heavy load, we all know if the space is there, it will get filled.
Knowing the electrical limits of a KLR, what about lighting and electric jacket?

Will a large 10 gallon safari gas tank interfere with the sidecar mounts? Anyone tried this yet?

What about an auxiliary tank on the back and gravity feed to the carb?

What say you all?
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Claus
Posted 2/2/2015 4:54 AM (#82573 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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Posts: 57
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Location: Northern Germany
Due to the wall thickness of the kawasaki frame tubes ( 0.04" ) I would buy or make a subframe for the motorcycle. This should connect both sides of the frame and should be able to take the sidecar at four mounts.
I personally would not like to miss a sidecar brake. If you take a small scooter rotor and caliper you can connect it to the front brake master. Maybe the master should be one size larger. It can be a used one, of course. Take a steel braided brake line. They are now available in any length for low price.
A light sidecar together with a dualsport bike like yours can be operated w/o sidecar brake but I would not recommend that.
What I would do as well is changing the rear shock to a stronger one. You´ll need it due to the +weight, the sidecar brings.
If you change the indicator relais to a load independent one for LED indicators you can mount LED indicators. The taillights and the sidecar´s marker light I would take LEDs as well. Equipped like that there will be no problems with the electric charging, because you need less charging than on the original bike w/o sidecar.

If you´re not satisfied how the rig pulls after converting you could change the rear sprocket for one with two or three teeth more. Instead of fitting a 10 gallon tank I would carry a jerrycan in the sidecar.

Edited by Claus 2/2/2015 5:00 AM
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Peter Pan
Posted 2/2/2015 10:15 AM (#82576 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Location: San Isidro de Heredia, Costa Rica
Jan, I enjoyed your last summer's trip Cost to coast, So when you pass by here and later take the ferry from Colon to Cartagena,
I'd love to invite you for a rest stop and accompany you on the Goody roads, from border to border. Don't travel on the boaring straightees!

I bought my Kawa for to mount a sidecar on it, when after 2000km the tail came loose I did not continue with the plan. For a trip like you plan it is perfect, but not for this mule, writing these sentences, riding in our mountain range on a daily base.
I second the idea of a STRONG subframe, as I see the engine as pretty good choice,(24.000miles now and no issue at all) but the frame needs to be beefed up a lot!
Open the rear suspension and pack it with marine grease!!!! From factory it comes practically dry!!!
I'd suggest to use a KLR back or front wheel for the sidecar. (taking it from a scrap bike, the other wheel could work as reserve and the sidecar could be made for to accept front or back wheel. just a thought)

Take spokes with you as reserve.
Get yourself a good assembly paste, I use Chesterton 785 and 710, Excellent results for 17 years now.
Wish You good luck.
Sven
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jaydmc
Posted 2/2/2015 10:55 AM (#82578 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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As many people read these posts for many years to come, I will comment. Yes to the brake, there is limited traction on the front tire on the KLR with a loaded sidecar going down steep loose terrain I have had to chose to either use the traction that the front tire has for steering or for braking but not both. Not a choice I ever want to make again. The brake we offer uses a small brake rotor we make our selves out of cast iron and runs a Brembo caliper. It can either be worked off of the stock rear master or we do offer a separate pedal for the bike that sits next to the bikes brake pedal such that you can work one or both brakes. I also recommend a stiffer spring for the rear of the bike. We offer a spring, as it requires a special spring compressor most people ship us their shock, we install the spring (no charge to install the spring) and ship it back the same day. With our sub frame you loose any skid pans you may have. We offer an optional skid pan that works with our mounts. When ever you add a sidecar you end up with heavy steering. Most people with KLR's learn to live with the heavy steering. We do offer a leading link front end for the KLR. The mounts are not year specific, they work on all years of KLR's however the leading link is year specific, post and pre 2008.
Jay G
DMC sidecars
www.dmcsidecars.com
866-638-1793
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SwampFox
Posted 2/2/2015 9:17 PM (#82587 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Location: Summer Grove, LA USA
Good advice above Jon. The 1st complaint I generally hear re: KLR rigs is the stock suspension is not up to the task and result in sloppy handling/steering (we've had two Texas fellows assemble KLR rigs in the past couple of years, but quickly disassemble 'em as they weren't dedicated to finishig the project). So I agree, subframe and beefy spring(s). Also, with a 6 gallon stock tank, I too suggest jerry can(s) for extra fuel rather than oversize tank - should result in better weight balance.
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CCjon
Posted 2/3/2015 8:53 PM (#82600 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Location: NWHouston
Lee,thanks for that heads up. What kind of front springs have worked for other KLR hacks? Anybody know?? Only see one option on the KLR650.com site. A Studebaker brand. They have a Progressive but it is for the KLR650-B.

Today we placed our order with Jay at DMC for a rolling chassis with fender and a 19" wheel. Basically their cargo hack less the box. Will come with a DMC subframe make for the KLR and all their fittings. Wait time is 4 - 6 weeks when ordered now. Added the sidecar brake at the suggestion of many. Looked at the separate brake pedal, but since I am lowering the foot pegs, the DMC pedal won't fit, so we are going with tying into the rear master cylinder.

Also ordered the subframe reinforcement kit from Eagle Mike with several others pieces and an order with KLR650.com.

Anyone know, is there an easy way to determine if the doohickey has been upgraded? The previous owner only had the bike for a year and know little of its history.

Will be on the look out for an aftermarket seat, a taller windshield, ATV handlebars and ROX risers.

Spotted this switch above the speedo, ask the seller what it was. He said to turn off the headlight if you wanted to run without it. Well, right now that switch does nothing. Might use it to trigger some LED driving lights. When I pull the headlight cover we'll trace the wiring down.







(Mystery Switch.jpg)



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Claus
Posted 2/4/2015 9:29 AM (#82608 - in reply to #82600)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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Location: Northern Germany
Will come with a DMC subframe make for the KLR and all their fittings.


That was a good idea.


Looked at the separate brake pedal, but since I am lowering the foot pegs, the DMC pedal won't fit, so we are going with tying into the rear master cylinder.


If the rear master ist too small for it, take the next larger diameter . You´ll see if it ´s necessary when the pedal is real soft after bleeding and it acts as if it´can´t be bleeded properly.
With a small brembo caliper I would go from for example 12mm to 14mm (9/16") if available.


Spotted this switch above the speedo, ask the seller what it was. He said to turn off the headlight if you wanted to run without it. Well, right now that switch does nothing. Might use it to trigger some LED driving lights.



It´s perfect for LED driving lights. On my own bike I would like to have a switch to turn off headlight while starting the bike, if it´s not automatically switching off itself. That sometimes makes the difference between starting the bike under bad conditions or calling for assistance...
Put a 30A relais between switch and light, so the light gets currency directly from the battery and use the switch to cut the relay´s negative ground. You´ll find out that your headlight is +30% and the switch has only to work with milli amperes.
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jaydmc
Posted 2/4/2015 10:40 AM (#82614 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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As to suspension, talk with Kelly at Studebaker, he is a sidecarist and has ran two of our Enduro sidecars to the Artic ocean on KLR's He knows KLR better then I do when it comes to suspension.
Jay G
DMC sidecars
www.dmcsidecars.com
866-638-1793
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CCjon
Posted 2/4/2015 8:08 PM (#82623 - in reply to #82608)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Location: NWHouston


It´s perfect for LED driving lights. On my own bike I would like to have a switch to turn off headlight while starting the bike, if it´s not automatically switching off itself. That sometimes makes the difference between starting the bike under bad conditions or calling for assistance...
Put a 30A relais between switch and light, so the light gets currency directly from the battery and use the switch to cut the relay´s negative ground. You´ll find out that your headlight is +30% and the switch has only to work with milli amperes.


Thanks Claus, will install the 30A relay for the driving lights.
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CCjon
Posted 2/4/2015 8:19 PM (#82624 - in reply to #82614)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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jaydmc - 2/4/2015 9:40 AM

As to suspension, talk with Kelly at Studebaker,


Thanks Jay. Did a google search but only came up with the former auto company. Can you PM me the contact email or phone #?


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Claus
Posted 2/5/2015 5:33 AM (#82631 - in reply to #82623)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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Location: Northern Germany
CCjon - 2/5/2015 2:08 AM



It´s perfect for LED driving lights. On my own bike I would like to have a switch to turn off headlight while starting the bike, if it´s not automatically switching off itself. That sometimes makes the difference between starting the bike under bad conditions or calling for assistance...
Put a 30A relais between switch and light, so the light gets currency directly from the battery and use the switch to cut the relay´s negative ground. You´ll find out that your headlight is +30% and the switch has only to work with milli amperes.


Thanks Claus, will install the 30A relay for the driving lights.


My post was mentioned to the normal headlight, not for the LED driving light. They can be connected w/o a relais. (in case I understood something wrong due to normally speaking German)
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jaydmc
Posted 2/5/2015 10:49 AM (#82637 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack


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Studebaker manufacturing is also I believe KLR.com Here is a link to their contact information. http://start.cortera.com/company/research/k2l0sur1r/studebaker-manu... For what it is worth, they also for a while were brought the Vetter Terraplane back into production.
Jay G
DMC sidecars
www.dmcsidecars.com
866-638-1793
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CCjon
Posted 2/8/2015 10:52 PM (#82674 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Location: NWHouston
Continue stripping parts off the bike. Found many to be rusted so bad they are snapping off. Have relied on a B"LASTER PB a penetrating catalyst to loose nuts and bolts. A steading treatment of spray, waits, wrench, spray again, wait, try again and again. Finally getting the bolt off.

Ordered a subframe reinforcing kit which requires drilling through a solid steel backbone of the KLR.


Edited by CCjon 2/9/2015 11:24 AM




(P2065004.jpg)



(P2075012.jpg)



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CCjon
Posted 2/8/2015 11:01 PM (#82675 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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KLR's have a well known achilles heel - commonly referred to as the "doohickey". The Doo is a spring actuated cam chain tensioner. The spring and Doo have been known to break, allowing small steel parts to wander around causing havoc with the engine.

Spotted a posting about how to check if your Doo is okay or not. Requires removing the left side engine cover.

Then look to the left and behind the stub where the Doo pivots. You should see part of the spring. Opened the case but could not see the spring.

Edited by CCjon 2/9/2015 11:27 AM




(P2035002.jpg)



(P2085015.jpg)



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CCjon
Posted 2/8/2015 11:07 PM (#82676 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Took it step further and removed the next case and flywheel. This is what I found.


Luckily both pieces were still attached and not wandering around loose. Installed an upgrade, an Eagle Mike cam chain tensioner with torsion spring.


Edited by CCjon 2/8/2015 11:12 PM




(P2085020.jpg)



(P2085021.jpg)



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SwampFox
Posted 2/9/2015 8:10 AM (#82687 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Look at that broken spring - sure glad you took the time to inspect before the journey. Looks like you're making good progress.

By the way, I've "heard" that a smaller front wheel, say 18", will reduce trail on a KLR with favorable results.
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Peter Pan
Posted 2/9/2015 8:44 AM (#82690 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Uhhh, that was close. Thank you for reminding me.
So in the future each time I take that slack out, I will have to recheck if it does it in deed!
In fact twice I have heard a small movement...tick.
Continue well in your preparations.

Sven
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CCjon
Posted 2/9/2015 10:39 PM (#82720 - in reply to #82690)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Peter Pan - 2/9/2015 7:44 AM

So in the future each time I take that slack out, I will have to recheck if it does it in deed!
In fact twice I have heard a small movement...tick.
Sven


Sven if you remove the left side case cover, you should be able to see the spring behind the doohickey. To test if the spring is working, loosed the bolt holding the cam chain tensioner one half turn. With a long screwdriver, push the Doo to the right, then release. If working properly, it will return to center on its own. If not, then something is wrong and you will have to remove the second case and flywheel to see why the Doo doesn't return to center.

Ride safe
Jan
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CCjon
Posted 3/5/2015 10:28 AM (#83222 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Sorry for the delay in build progress. Life keeps interrupting.

Every morning I kept finding a small dribble of oil on the lift. Discovered the rear shock is shot, leaking oil. Looked into rebuilding the OEM shock, was told is not feasible, and if feasible, not cost effective. Then looked at the cost of an aftermarket shock.... WOW! Since DMC is going to install a stronger spring on the rear shock as part of the package purchase, opted for buying another OEM shock off eBay.

The KLR has been recolored and slowly coming back together.

As boxes of bits and pieces arrive, they are added on.

As she stands now, the bike is ready to ride. But, Sorry Charlie, she will NOT be getting fitted with a sidecar....!



Edited by CCjon 3/5/2015 10:35 AM




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(P3025070.jpg)



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CCjon
Posted 3/5/2015 10:32 AM (#83223 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Location: NWHouston
A big eyed beauty has entered the picture and will be the new tug of choice.



(P3025084.jpg)



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Peter Pan
Posted 3/5/2015 2:37 PM (#83226 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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nice colours nice eyes. I have seen that face somewhen in a film. ( together with Gregory Peck?)
The brown one is service friendly...what fore to wash?
Thank You for the tip and explanation.
Sven
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CCjon
Posted 4/1/2015 9:44 PM (#83709 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Finished up the Gen 1 KLR, thought it was sold, but still have it. Is getting crowded in the garage with three bikes here. Need to make room for the crate coming from DMC.

Have been working on the Gen 2 KLR, while we wait for the sidecar chassis to arrive. Added handlebar risers, USB port on the front, LED headlight bulbs, fork brace, installed the upgraded Doohickey, the saddlebag rack and topbox plate.

The bike's wiring was studied and changed around. Getting under the seat to check a fuse takes too long when on the side of the road. So the main fuses were relocated to under the left side panel. Since I'll be wiring in additional outlets, looked and looked for a fuse block that would fit the KLR, finally found a long narrow one for six fused circuits. Again mounted it on the left side so I can check and change any fuse without having to remove multiple nuts and bolts.

Decided to upgrade the drive chain and sprockets for pulling a sidecar. Installed a heavy duty 525 o-ring chain, a 15 tooth 525 counter sprocket and and a 49 tooth rear sprocket.

Little by little the big eyed beauty is getting ready for a rolling chassis. DMC Sidecar advised me to be on the look out a a large wooden crate arriving soon. Christmas in April, I love it.

Edited by CCjon 4/1/2015 9:53 PM




(06 KLR done.jpg)



(Gen 2 on progress.jpg)



(Three bikes in garage.jpg)



(Risers and USB port.jpg)



(49 Tooth Rear Sprocket.jpg)



(KLR Fuse Block.jpg)



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CCjon
Posted 4/1/2015 9:59 PM (#83710 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Location: NWHouston
Other work done was to upgrade the rear subframe with the Eagle Mike kit by drilling through the main frame backbone. Installed a simple non-vacuum petcock on the gas tank, then rejected the carb. Not sure if will change the exhaust or not. The DG is too loud, but would like a more open flow, without spending a lot.

Edited by CCjon 4/1/2015 11:31 PM
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SwampFox
Posted 4/2/2015 8:44 AM (#83720 - in reply to #82571)
Subject: Re: Assembling a Hack



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Hey, that's a good idea moving the fuse block for easy access.
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