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Sidecar turns
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claude #3563
Posted 11/28/2017 8:18 PM (#95762 - in reply to #95709)
Subject: Re: Sidecar turns



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Location: Middleburg, Pa
Predecessor to 'the yellow book' i.E. Riding a Sidecar Outfit. Same author almost same content as far as most
riding instruction goes . Click here: http://welcome-ural.ru/documents/HowToRideUral.pdf


Edited by claude #3563 11/28/2017 8:28 PM
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soupy1957
Posted 11/29/2017 4:15 AM (#95766 - in reply to #95709)
Subject: Re: Sidecar turns



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Location: CT
“Flying the chair” must be BRUTAL on the tire bead and tread, yes????
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Peter Pan
Posted 11/29/2017 8:22 AM (#95767 - in reply to #95709)
Subject: Re: Sidecar turns



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Steve,
much worse spokes and frame!

The MZ rig during study time need every 3-5 month a pry bar treatment due to my pirouettes.
Take into account that all bikes are designed to take force vertically through the centre line. On the rig ALL side forces go via a long lever around the centre of gravity. Which by the way changes with every of your movements. On such a light weight rig like yours (and my first 2) the weight shifting effect is tremendous and permits us to steer even on ice, snow, gravel and mud where others will go into the ditch without hope.
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claude #3563
Posted 11/29/2017 9:23 PM (#95774 - in reply to #95709)
Subject: Re: Sidecar turns



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Location: Middleburg, Pa
Soupy question #2:I have heard a few times now, from different individuals, that you should learn how to lift your side car. Why is that important? Wouldn’t I want to avoid that at all costs?
.....................................................................................................................................................................
Response to post @2.
EVERYONE HERE HAS AN OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND THEIR PERSONAL SKILL ENVELOPE. We should all take that statement to heart. We can plan our actions but not our reactions! Good reactions are something that can potentially save our butt as well as our family, friends and anyone that may be riding with us. So, how do we expand our reactions? practicing a little at a time above our present comfort zones.
As far as the chair coming up it can happen on any rig but does so much easier on some than others.
The objective when in a turn is to complete the turn safely. The first 'reaction' that someone has to the sidecar wheel coming up is typically to steer away from the turn to bring it back down, This is NOT good thing as it will so many time allow the rig to go in tje direction the bats have been turned to. Th objective is to make the corner safely and crossing the center line is only going to produce a failing grade which can have some very serious and sad results. YOU need to complete the rurn..period!! .
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soupy1957
Posted 11/30/2017 5:49 PM (#95791 - in reply to #95760)
Subject: Re: Sidecar turns



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Location: CT
claude #3563 - 11/28/2017 7:42 PM

Your Post#1:
When entering a right hand turn, with an American motorcycle/sidecar setup, (sidecar on the right side)is it safer to drop down early into the turn, following the inside track of the turn, or to swing wide initially, and cut down into the turn, later?? (Assuming a slow to moderate speed in the approach). Which way will yield the safest results without “flying the car?”

Response to #1:
The best way to enter a right hand turn is to do your braking before the turn. Enter the turn at a spped you are comfortable with according to your present skill level.
Enter the turn up high by the centerline.
Go for a late apex (this means you enter high and exit low)
Once you 'turn in' you are done braking and can gradually pick up the throttle.
If you practice this technique you will find that in time your speed will magically increase as your experience grows and you become more 'one with the machine'.
The high entry allows you to see farther through the turn which is a good thing. You can better detect whether it is a consistant sweeper or a turn with a decreasing radius. A good view also may tip you off of any other hazards that would not be seen if you entered low.
Entering high and shooting for a late apex also gives you more 'wiggle room' on exit which can be benifical.
Entering low and all of a sudden finding you are in a decreasing radius turn or there is a tree laying in the road or a huge rock is in your path can create some pucker moments or worse that do nothing for your fun meter an can potentially be a disaster.

Do not worry about speed at first ...if you practice good technique you will find, in time, that your speed will increase . However, with that being said, it is impossible to increase one's skill envelope if they do not practice (IN A SAFE PLACE) a little at a time above their current comfort zone.

I will address the so called 'flying the chair' question in a following response hang tight lol.



GREAT stuff!!!!!
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soupy1957
Posted 12/10/2017 11:12 AM (#95868 - in reply to #95716)
Subject: Re: Sidecar turns



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Location: CT
........... That is what you will see Dave Hough do in the pictures in the "Yellow Book" - I think it is called The Sidecar Training Manual. I think it is available from the USCA bookstore on this forum. It is a good resource........


I will check in here, for the book by David Hough. Amazon sells it for $150, and that’s a little steep for me!!
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jwshort
Posted 12/11/2017 9:14 PM (#95879 - in reply to #95709)
Subject: Re: Sidecar turns


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I went to the DMC website and found the book for $34.95. I saw that $150 offering and was shocked.
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