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All gone dead
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Posted 4/1/2005 3:23 AM (#7096)
Subject: All gone dead


Maybe someone can help me with this one.

I plugged in a small electric pump to the 12V connector on my GL1000 in order to inflate the tyres. The pump was very cheap. I tested it first before attaching the nozzle to the tyre valve. It pumped.

Next I attached the nozzle to the valve, turn on the pump switch and DEAD. Nothing. All the lights are out. NO electrics work.

I found a blown 5amp fuse in the fuse box. I have replaced this, but still nothing. The oil light is not on, the neutral light is not on, no headlights work, nothing.

What is the next step? I tried drinking coffee, but no bulbs are lighting over my head.

Oh yeah, I have thrown away the pump.

Simon
GL1000 with EML sidecar
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Goldwing
Posted 4/1/2005 4:25 AM (#7097 - in reply to #7096)
Subject: RE: All gone dead


Simon,

The GL has a main fuse that is usually on the side of the celliond. It is a little black box that opens. This should be a thin silver flat fuse.
Most have been replaced with a copper wire, the honda fuse is much safer.
What year 1000 do you have, and how much have you ridden it?
I have a couple of 1000s that I really enjoy.
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Posted 4/1/2005 5:25 AM (#7098 - in reply to #7097)
Subject: RE: All gone dead


HI.
Thanks for getting back to me. I should have said in my post that I have checked the main fuse. No problem.

It is a 1976 GL, with a 1100 engine put in it and a EML sidecar. I have has it a couple of months: my first outfit. I have just become a father so we need a family vehicle. I am not a big fan of automobiles.

It has taken a while to get used, to unlearn all the things that the body now subconsciously does on two wheels. Now summer is coming I am looking forwards to touring and camping all over.
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MikeS
Posted 4/1/2005 7:36 AM (#7100 - in reply to #7096)
Subject: RE: All gone dead



Regular

Posts: 60
2525
Location: Grand Marais, MN
Remove the battery cables from the battery and clean the terminals with sandpaper. This will probably solve your problem. Next. clean the fusable link battery terminals. Mine is located just to the right of the battery, on my GL1100. In addition, follow the negative cable to where it attaches to the motorcycle. Mine connects above the transmission, to the transmission mount bolt. Remove the transmission mount, sand the contact points between the cable terminal and the engine. Finally, use sandpaper to clean the terminal at the starter. It's amazing how this fixes things. My guess is this will solve your problem, especially cleaning the battery terminals.

If your battery cable ends or cable looks in disrepair, go to an auto parts dealer, and replace them. You'll have to remove the cable, and have them build a matching one.

If your battery is below 11.5 volts, charge it up with a battery tender.

Next, get yourself a volt meter that reads 15 volts minimum. Take the black lead (negative lead), touch it to the battery negative, and touch the red to the positive. You should have about 13 volts. Next follow the positive cable to the fusable link, as referred to above. Touch the red lead to each of the terminals of the fusable link. You should have a reading on each terminal. Next turn on the ignition and touch the red lead to your fuses, both sides. Again, you should have a reading on the fuses, all of them when the ignition is on. In all tests here, keep the black volt meter lead touching the negative battery terminal.

Mike Senty

Edited by MikeS 4/1/2005 7:43 AM
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Posted 4/3/2005 3:24 AM (#7124 - in reply to #7096)
Subject: RE: All gone dead


There should be a special name for this type of problem.

I looked at the main fuse again, and found that it was fine. I cleaned the battery terminals and connections, traced the negative grounding point and cleaned that too. I measured the voltage on the battery and at the main fuse. All good. All the secondary fuses were good too. I changed a few, just in case.

Learning how to use a multi-meter has fulfilled one longstanding ambition at least.

Despite not finding the problem I felt better. Illiminating the possibilities, even if the bike still isn't running, feels like getting nearer to the source, even though there are still another zillion possible faults to be checked off.

I found a good 12 volts at the main fuse but nothing at the secondary fuses. Ah ha. I would like to say that the solution was at hand, and maybe it was, but not for me. A friend took three minutes to locate a loose connector soon after the main fuse. A matter of a twiddling a bit and all was well.

I must have jogged the connector when looking at the main fuse way back at the start of this process. For a second or two the bike must have been fixed. Then I broke it again. A fault caused by my trying to solve the previous error.

So what do you call this type of problem? One where each error leads to another, where as soon as think you are on top of the situation you have only spawned another problem, in a kind of infinite linear chain of error caused by the very fact of trying to work things out, staggering from one puzzle to another always of your own stupid making? Then it came to me. This is called, *life*.
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MikeS
Posted 4/20/2005 6:34 PM (#7377 - in reply to #7096)
Subject: RE: All gone dead



Regular

Posts: 60
2525
Location: Grand Marais, MN
Glad you found your problem and are not dead any more. Looks like you "done good".

One more trick; go to your hardware store, and ask for "dielectric grease", which generally is in the house electrical wiring section. Apply this to any of your spade connectors, by pulling them apart and applying grease. It makes a better connection, reduces corrosion (the cause of failed connections), and generally makes the electrons more willing to "slide across the connections". I've fixed some on again, off again spade connections this way. I use this grease for all my crimp wiring connections, prior to making the crimp. It also helps a lot for those connections that are constantly exposed to weather, like a GL1100 horn connection, and the connectors in front of the battery/next to the alternator.

BTW, GL1100 with EML sidecar. Great rig!

Mike Senty

Edited by MikeS 4/20/2005 6:36 PM
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